Fused Glass & Glass Blowing Education  

Fusing Glass | Learn Glass Blowing | How To Cut Fused Glass | Etching On Glass


 
 

Glass Artist Tips & Tricks Archive

Glass Archive Organized by month.
July 2006 / August 2006 / September 2006 / October 2006 / November 2006 / December 2006 / January 2007 / February 2007 / March 2007 / April 2007 / May 2007 / June 2007 / July 2007 / August 2007 / January 2008 / July 2008
November 2010 / December 2010

December 15, 2010

If you really want to bring your glass fusing skills to the next level then you need to start keeping a log / sketch book. I know this sounds simple but it really will help you in the long run.

By using a sketch book both before and after you enter the glass studio you will be able problem solve when things go wrong and also start to reduce the number of "happy accidents" that we all inevitably find in our kilns.

For example when you first start making glass art you will be amazed at the myriad of colors and designs that are on your piece when it comes out of the kiln. But will you be able to do that again? Probably not if you don't have a record of what you did or were trying to do. Thus a log book will help you remember which frit you mixed to get that final color or what dichroic glass you used to make that amazing piece.

Also your sketchbook makes a great place to keep all your kiln firing schedules. Therefore the next time you want to do some tack fusing or glass slumping you wont have to go hunting through a bunch of scattered papers just to find that information.

December 3, 2010

In the ‘Olden Days’, each glass factory had at least one ‘mold maker’. They would carve their molds out of fruitwood, some closable for blowing hot glass into, some open for slumping glass atop of. But what is slumping glass? Slump or Slumping glass is when you heat a piece of glass and it softens and thus slumps into or onto a mold that you have placed below it. Basically after you make the glass more fluid with heat, gravity pulls down on the glass which bends it into/onto whatever object you have put in the kiln. Now if you slump glass into a mold it's called sagging and if you slump it over a mold it's called draping.

Nowadays people use fired ceramics so if you favor any of the ceramics shops where one can go to paint and pary with ceramic objects, any one of them can be used as a glass mold (once covered with ThinFire paper or kiln wash, of course). The same is true of any stainless steel object. I.e. shot glass and/or martini shakers can be draped with glass to make nice candle holders. If you are good at ceramics you could actually make your own mold in clay, fire it, and then use it as a mold. The same would be true of metal workers, albeit a lot of work for something that can probably be purchased at a savings of time and energy. Thus you can form plates and bowels rather easily in your kiln using the slumping method and there are a plethora of glass molds out there to do just that. For example a brief look at Delphi glass revealed that they have 30 different bowl molds for sale and 70 different platter and plate molds. I also did a quick look at the Bullseye glass website and found they have 104 molds for sale from Creative Ceramics in Europe. But if you really want to find a large variety of molds I would check out the company called Slumpys. They are located in North Carolina and have a ton of glass slumping molds for sale.

Glass Classes by State

Glass Classes by State

Fused Glass Tools

Fused Glass Tools

Glass Supplies

Glass Suppliers

Featured Glass Artist

Featured Glass Artist

Glass Artist Tips & Tricks Archive

Glass Artist Tips

   
 
Kiln Firing Schedule Need a warm glass firing schedule?
 
Stay Informed with
 
 
Web Design by Neal Robinson